WIC FAQs

WIC FAQ

Find answers to the most commonly asked questions about WIC.

Are WIC services free?

Yes, all WIC services are free to women, infants and children who have a nutrition risk and meet federal income guidelines.

What does WIC consider as income?

Income eligibility is automatic when an applicant receives medical assistance (MA), Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) and food stamps (SNAP); however, applicants must provide income documentation. Foster children younger than 5 years are eligible. Income is counted for everyone living in the household.

What about fathers?

Fathers of children younger than 5 years are encouraged to enroll their children in the WIC program. Just like any other parent or guardian, fathers can bring their children to appointments, attend nutrition classes and cash food vouchers for their children. Active participation by fathers is a great help in keeping WIC recipients healthy.

What if I am a grandparent?

If you are a grandparent who has custody of grandchildren younger than 5 years, you may apply on their behalf. If you do not have custody, you may accompany your grandchildren and their parent to the WIC appointment, and you may become a proxy. A proxy is a person who acts on behalf of the WIC parent/caretaker to come to WIC to pick up vouchers and/or go to the grocery store to redeem them. Families raising foster children may also be eligible for WIC services.

What if I'm a teen? Do I qualify if I live with my mom or dad?

In most cases, if you are a teen, you must count all of the income of your household when determining if you are eligible for WIC. Please call 717-843-7942 to find out if you are income eligible.

Where do I go to get the food?

Food vouchers are issued for each client. These vouchers are made out for specific WIC foods and can be redeemed at any participating WIC-authorized store.

What other services am I eligible for?

WIC will refer you to a variety of health and social service agencies and programs. WIC staff can help you find these services. Some examples are:

  • Medicaid, TANF and food stamps
  • Prenatal services like Healthy Beginnings Plus
  • Food pantries and emergency food programs
  • Substance abuse treatment programs
  • Head Start of York County and child care options
  • Child support enforcement
  • Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
  • Special Kids Network
  • Childhood lead poison screening
  • Childhood immunization providers

How does someone report a complaint or suspected program abuse?

To report program abuse or a complaint, call 1-800-942-9467 to connect with the local WIC agency serving that county. WIC staff investigates all complaints or reports of alleged program abuse and takes appropriate action if warranted. If you have already contacted the local WIC agency with no satisfaction, please call the state agency at 717-783-1289. WIC will keep the name of the reporter confidential if requested.